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Archive for the ‘International Supporters of SHARPS’ Category

To sign the petition demanding Samsung be accountable for the health and labour rights of its electronics workers:

http://www.petitiononline.com/mod_perl/signed.cgi?s4m5ung

Here are some of the Samsung petition comments:

“I will not buy Samsung products until the company takes responsibility for these deaths and provides safe working conditions for its workers”

Margaret Okuzumi, USA

There is an investment risk in Samsung from a GRI reporting perspective.  We expect Samsung to do the right thing, particularly so as not to dishonor the current Secretary General of the UN”

Klaus-Peter Finke, USA

“Do the right thing.  The world is watching”

Beth, USA

“I use a Samsung cell phone and now I am horrified to learn that the price of owning it may be associated with workers’ deaths.

Diane Heminway, USA, United Steelworkers

“It’s a disgrace that such a successful company cannot secure the safety of their workers.”

o   Subia Sinha, UK

“Samsung: world leader in corporate social irresponsibility”

o   Hilde van Regenmortel, Hong Kong

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Another cancer death at Samsung but Korean government arrests OHS activists

On March 31, 2010, Park Ji-yeon — a young worker from Samsung’s Onyang semiconductor factory — died of leukemia at age 23. Her tragic death came less than one month after Samsung workers, their families, and community supporters participated in the 1st Memorial Week of occupational deaths of semiconductor workers to honor the memory of the many other workers who gave their lives working at Samsung. There are now 23 documented cases of Samsung workers who have suffered from blood cancers like leukemia or lymphoma, and 9 workers among them have already died. A petition to support the workers can be read and signed here: http://www.petitiononline.com/s4m5ung/petition-sign.html.

We express our deepest sympathies and condolences to the families of all who lost their lives after working at Samsung. (Samsung is now one of the world’s most powerful corporations — they enjoyed record sales of $120.48 billion in 2009 , and now rank # 1 in flat screen TV sales and #2 in mobile phone sales globally).

We collectively grieve this tragic and unnecessary loss of life and express our outrage that occupational cancers are a growing health crisis in the electronics industry. This problem is not confined to Samsung or Korea. This is an industry-wide issue because the companies create unsafe workplaces throughout the world, and unsafe conditions in the communities in which they operate. A series of recent investigations in the US, UK, Taiwan and elsewhere have highlighted an elevated cancer risk in workers in the semiconductor industry (for more information, see http://www.ehjournal.net/content/5/1/30 ). For far too long, electronics industry executives have continued to deny responsibility and have treated chemical exposure and the resulting cancer deaths as simply the cost of doing business. We say “Enough Is Enough!”

Instead of conducting a proper investigation of the occupational nature of the deaths and adopting adequate prevention measures, the Korean government supported Samsung and joined its efforts to silence the growing evidence of a cancer cluster among electronics manufacturing workers at Samsung in Korea who have been exposed to toxic chemicals. On 2nd April there was a funeral ceremony for Park Ji-yeon, followed by a press conference at Samsung headquarters in Seoul to demand accountability from Samsung. The press conference was broken up by the police who then arrested seven of the activists who then shouted to Samsung “You are responsible for the death of Ji-Yeon Park.” They were released 2 days later without charges.

We condemn these actions by Samsung and the Korean government and demand that:

  • Samsung acknowledge its responsibility for the cancer deaths of its workers;
  • The Korean government enforce its laws against Samsung for its actions rather than punish its workers and their supporters. (more…)

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