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Archive for August 11th, 2016

ITUC

In her blog post for The Huffington Post, ITUC General Secretary Sharan Burrow criticized Samsung for worker abuse.

 

The Samsung conglomerate has medieval working conditions behind modern technology, Sharan Burrow, general secretary of the International Trade Union Confederation, summed up in her Huffington Post blog on Aug. 10, as she criticized the world’s largest technology company and its affiliates for poor working conditions.

Moral Compass

“Samsung is a business model that has lost its moral compass, based on exploitation and abuse of human rights at its supply chain,” said Burrow.

She announced that the ITUC has started a petition drive to end no-union policy and worker abuse at Samsung.

Petition Drive

The ITUC, based in Brussel,  is a leading voice of the world’s working people. The confederation represents 176 million workers through its 328 affiliated organizations within 162 countries and territories.

All are invited to sign the petition at http://act.ituc-csi.org/en/samsung

The following is a full text of the ITUC’s petition: 

Samsung: end worker abuse and abolish your “no-union” policy now

Samsung has a reputation for modern technology, but also a history of medieval conditions for the estimated 1,500,000 workers entrenched in a vast and shadowy web of subcontractors and subsidiaries that runs deep throughout the region. What’s more, the Asia Monitor Resource Centre (AMRC) reports that Samsung’s “no-union” policy affects the entire Asian electronics industry, “because Samsung Electronics intervenes actively to prevent the formation of unions at its suppliers.”

A leaked PowerPoint presentation — intended for the eyes of corporate bosses only — decrees specific “countermeasures” to be used to “dominate employees.” And the language is shocking. The leaked material instructs managers to: “isolate employees,” “punish leaders,” and “induce internal conflicts.” And that’s just corporate policy. AMRC reports instances of grave abuse, where Samsung “tapped workers’ phones, followed them, and approached their families with threats.”

With a precariously-employed workforce, inhumane conditions are rife. According to China Labor Watch, employees at Samsung factories, some under-aged, suffer through 100 hours of forced overtime per month, unpaid work, standing for 11 to 12 hours, verbal and physical abuse, severe age and gender discrimination, lack of worker safety… During a three-month period while the Samsung Galaxy tablet was being rushed out, one worker testified that she: “slept about two or three hours a night,” and had to stop breastfeeding her three-month-old infant to keep up with schedule.

Samsung is everywhere. If you have a smartphone — an Android or iPhone — there’s a good chance that parts in your phone are produced on factory floors controlled by Samsung and its affiliated companies. Now it’s up to all of us to tell Samsung this must stop now.

SHARPS’s Sit-in: 300 Days And Still Counting

Since Oct. 7, 2015, SHARPS and its supporters have been staging a sit-in at Samsung D’light, the company’s so-called global exhibition space in south Seoul, calling for the world’s largest technology company to:
1) compensate all victims of occupational disease transparently and sufficiently; and
2) make a sincere and full apology.

 

 

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APCapture

The Associated Press’s Big Story, an in-depth and investigative section, ran two separate stories on Samsung and its occupational-disease victims in eight months’ time.

South Korean authorities have repeatedly complied with Samsung Electronics Co.’s requests and refused to release critical data about chemicals, which could be used to prove the work-relatedness of the illnesses of at least six former Samsung workers who have been seeking workers compensation, the Associated Press on Aug 10 reported in its investigative reporting section, The Big Story.

Guarding Trade Secrets Against Human Life

Both the government and Samsung have cited “trade secrets” for not giving up the information, according to the AP.  “Court documents and interviews with government officials, workers’ lawyers and their families show Samsung often cites the need to protect trade secrets when it asks government officials not to release such data,” said the news agency.

Although South Korea’s law does not allow the government to withhold the release of corporate information critical to individuals’ lives, physical safety and health, the AP pointed out, any such violation does not carry a penalty.

“Government officials openly say corporate interests take priority, that evaluating trade-secrets claims is difficult,” the AP added, “and that they fear being sued for sharing data against a company’s will.”

KOSHA’s Clients

In an interview with the AP, Yang Won-baek, of the Korea Occupational Safety and Health Agency, used the term “clients” to describe corporations.  Asked by the AP why he used that word, Yang answered he treats the companies that his agency is mandated to regulate “as I treat clients.”   “[T]he companies KOSHA evaluates also review the agency, and the finance ministry considers those reviews when it sets agency budgets,” Yang told the AP.

“Since 2008, 56 workers have applied for occupational safety compensation from the government,” said the AP, citing SHARPS’s data.  “Only 10 have won compensation, most after years of court battles. Half of the other 46 claims were rejected and half remain under review.”

AP’s Big Story

The latest report on Samsung and its occupational-disease victims is a second dispatch in eight months for the AP’s in-depth investigative section.  The first report was released on Dec. 11, 2016.

SHARPS’s Sit-in: 300 Days And Still Counting

Since Oct. 7, 2015, SHARPS and its supporters have been staging a sit-in at Samsung D’light, the company’s so-called global exhibition space in south Seoul, calling for the world’s largest technology company to:
1) compensate all victims of occupational disease transparently and sufficiently; and
2) make a sincere and full apology.

image (6)

A daily log of the sit-in written on Aug. 10, 2015 by Hwang Sang-ki, a 61-year-old taxi driver and the father of Yumi, the first publicly known victim of Hwang Yu-mi.  In the log, Hwang, also a SHARPS founder, said, “We make money, work and make semiconductors in order to live. However, Samsung’s Lee Kun-hee and Jae-yong  only make money at any cost–without taking any responsibility or showing any guilt feelings–although [their own] workers have died of cancer.

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